Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Quotable - Alain Badiou

After the sweeping movements of the 1960s and 1970s, we have inherited a very long counter-revolutionary period, economically, politically and ideologically. This counter-revolution has effectively destroyed the confidence and power that were once able to commit popular consciousness to the most elementary words of emancipatory politics – words, to cite a few at random, like “class struggle”, “general strike”, “revolution”, “mass democracy”’, and many others. The key word of “communism”, which dominated the political stage since the beginning of the 19th century, is itself henceforth confined to a sort of historical infamy. That the equation “communism equals totalitarianism” should come to appear as natural and be unanimously accepted is an indication of how badly revolutionaries failed during the disastrous 1980s. Of course, we also cannot avoid an incisive and severe criticism of what the socialist states and communist parties in power, especially in the Soviet Union, had become. But this criticism should be our own. It should nourish our own theories and practices, helping them to progress, and not lead to some kind of morose renunciation, throwing out the political baby with the historical bathwater. This has led to an astonishing state of affairs: regarding a historical episode of capital importance for us, we have adopted, practically without restriction, the point of view of the enemy. And those who haven’t done so have simply persevered in the old lugubrious rhetoric, as if nothing had happened.

Alain Badiou (h/t)

The whole column is worth reading.

No comments:

Post a Comment